The Need for Good Sportsmanship in Kiteboarding

We have all witnessed the drama that happened at the PKRA when they decided to re-run the final from the Pingtan event between Karolina Winkowska and Gisela Pulido at the last tour stop in Hainan. The decision was then overturned by the IKA. In between the two events kiteboarding forums and social media were on fire. The girls dissed each other publicly. People were taking sides – Team Gisela vs Team Karolina. What happened to good sportsmanship? Has everyone adopted a “win at all cost” philosophy? The phenomenon above does not only happen at the World Tour. It also happens a lot at smaller local competitions. There is always a lot of “whine whine whine” and “cry cry cry”.

The former coach of the Redkins was famous for his statement, “Winning isn’t the most important thing; it’s the only thing!” Shortly before he died, he looked back at the quote and declared, “I wish I’d never said it. I meant the effort. I sure didn’t mean for people to crush human values and morality.”

I recently read a quote that I liked a lot and that everybody competing should have in their mind: “Sometimes you win, sometimes you LEARN!” Winning also doesn’t necessarily mean that you are the best. If your main competitors are injured or decided that they will not compete, does that make you the best one out there? You might take a title or trophy home but always be true to yourself and be a good loser as well as a good winner. What does that mean?

Wikipedia writes:
Sportsmanship is an aspiration or ethos that a sport or activity will be enjoyed for its own sake, with proper consideration for fairness, ethics, respect and a sense of fellowship with one’s competitors. A sore loser refers to one who does not take defeat well, whereas a good sport means being a “good winner” as well as being a “good loser”.
A competitor who exhibits poor sportsmanship after losing a game or contest is often called a “sore loser” (those who show poor sportsmanship after winning are typically called “bad champs“). Sore loser behavior includes blaming others for the loss, not accepting responsibility for personal actions that contributed to the defeat, reacting to the loss in an immature or improper fashion, making excuses for the defeat, and citing unfavorable conditions or other petty issues as reasons for the defeat. A bad winner acts in a shallow fashion after his or her victory, such as by gloating about his or her win, rubbing the win in the face(s) of the opponent(s), and lowering the opponent(s)’s self-esteem by constantly reminding the opponent(s) of “poor” performance in comparison (even if the opponent(s) competed well).

So go compete, have fun and be a good sportsman!

10174786_10152414582196489_7411907166685866839_n

We have all witnessed the drama that happened at the PKRA when they decided to re-run the final from the Pingtan event between Karolina Winkowska and Gisela Pulido at the last tour stop in Hainan. The decision was then overturned by the IKA. In between the two events kiteboarding forums and social media were on fire. The girls dissed each other publicly. People were taking sides – Team Gisela vs Team Karolina. What happened to good sportsmanship? Has everyone adopted a “win at all cost” philosophy? The phenomenon above does not only happen at the World Tour. It also happens a lot at smaller local competitions. There is always a lot of “whine whine whine” and “cry cry cry”.

The former coach of the Redkins was famous for his statement, “Winning isn’t the most important thing; it’s the only thing!” Shortly before he died, he looked back at the quote and declared, “I wish I’d never said it. I meant the effort. I sure didn’t mean for people to crush human values and morality.”

I recently read a quote that I liked a lot and that everybody competing should have in their mind: “Sometimes you win, sometimes you LEARN!” Winning also doesn’t necessarily mean that you are the best. If your main competitors are injured or decided that they will not compete, does that make you the best one out there? You might take a title or trophy home but always be true to yourself and be a good loser as well as a good winner. What does that mean?

Wikipedia writes:
Sportsmanship is an aspiration or ethos that a sport or activity will be enjoyed for its own sake, with proper consideration for fairness, ethics, respect and a sense of fellowship with one’s competitors. A sore loser refers to one who does not take defeat well, whereas a good sport means being a “good winner” as well as being a “good loser”.
A competitor who exhibits poor sportsmanship after losing a game or contest is often called a “sore loser” (those who show poor sportsmanship after winning are typically called “bad champs“). Sore loser behavior includes blaming others for the loss, not accepting responsibility for personal actions that contributed to the defeat, reacting to the loss in an immature or improper fashion, making excuses for the defeat, and citing unfavorable conditions or other petty issues as reasons for the defeat. A bad winner acts in a shallow fashion after his or her victory, such as by gloating about his or her win, rubbing the win in the face(s) of the opponent(s), and lowering the opponent(s)’s self-esteem by constantly reminding the opponent(s) of “poor” performance in comparison (even if the opponent(s) competed well).

So go compete, have fun and be a good sportsman!

10174786_10152414582196489_7411907166685866839_n

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2 Comments on “The Need for Good Sportsmanship in Kiteboarding

  1. Dave

    Nice article, although your comment on “both girls publicly dissing each other” is wrong. I didn’t see one instance of Winkowska dissing Pulido, just a flurry of angry supporters dissing Pulido… which is pretty understandable given the scenario.

    Reply
    1. Silke

      Thank you for your comment, Dave! However, statements posted on the athletes’ social media pages, in the heat of the moment, are open to different interpretations. Our intention is not to offend anyone 😉

      Reply

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