Sea Creatures that no kiteboarder wants to encounter 

While kitesurfing you may have seen jellyfish in the water. If you get stung, here is what to do:

  1. Wash the area with sea water to deactivate the stinging cells. Don’t use fresh water or tap water. Fresh water can actually RE-activate the stinging cells!
  2. Soak or rinse the affected area with vinegar for 15-30 minutes.
  3. If you are stung by a Man O’ War jellyfish, don’t use vinegar as it will make their stings worse. Instead rinse the area with a baking soda/sea water mixture!
  4. Contrary to popular believe, you should never pee on a jellyfish sting! Depending on the urine, it can make things worse! Urine does not have the right chemical make-up to solve the problem!
  5. Antihistamines and applying hydrocortisone cream will help reduce itching and swelling.
  6. Get medical help.

 

Kiting in warm water and wearing a bathing suit while kiting is so much more fun than kiting in a wetsuit. Agree? But have you ever come out of the water with an itchy rash over your body and wondered what that is? Maybe you didn’t discover it till you were back in your room and you thought it might be sand fleas or mosquitos. Chances are that you have had an encounter with sea lice. Other common words are Agua Mala, Pica-Pica, Sea Bather’s Eruption. Sea lice occur in warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean and along the east and the west coasts of the United States. Sea lice are actually no lice at all, they are the larvae of the thimble jellyfish and other ocean stingers. The larvae is not visible to the naked eye. Their stinging cells are the same as the adults. In the water you may but not necessarily experience a stinging sensation. You may not feel anything when getting out of the water. The itchy rash develops within 24 hours after being in the ocean. Areas of bare skin are usually not affected but when they filter through your bathing suit, the fabric acts like a net. You know it’s probably sea lice if the rash is located on areas of skin that were covered by water-permeable clothing like your bikini or shorts.

3611040012_39b79742f6_b copy

Treatment of sea lice stings:

  1. Do not scratch the area. This will make things worse and result in even more intense itching. (Easier said than done: I have had sea lice stings and they itch like hell. But itching them will REALLY make things bad and the rash will get even more visible. So DON’T ITCH THEM)
  2. Remove the swim clothing as soon as possible.
  3. Shower with uncontaminated sea water if possible. A hot freshwater shower with soap is a less-effective alternative.
  4. Mashine-wash the contaminated swimsuit.
  5. Apply diluted vinegar to the affected area to deactivate the stinging cells.
  6. Hydrocortisone and antihistamines may also help.

 

Different people are affected differently by the stings. The immune system seems to play a role in the severity of the reaction.

 

The best way is to prevent. The only product I found is SAFE SEA sting protection lotion.

Chemical stoppers in the SAFE SEA block stop the chemical pathways where the stinging process is activated. The lotion is waterproof and comes in different SPF levels to suit the level of protection you need.

 

The SAFE SEA lotion can be bought here:

Safe Sea Kids Anti-Jellyfish Sting Lotion 30+ SPF

 

 

 

Another way of prevention is to swim or kite naked 😛

While kitesurfing you may have seen jellyfish in the water. If you get stung, here is what to do:

  1. Wash the area with sea water to deactivate the stinging cells. Don’t use fresh water or tap water. Fresh water can actually RE-activate the stinging cells!
  2. Soak or rinse the affected area with vinegar for 15-30 minutes.
  3. If you are stung by a Man O’ War jellyfish, don’t use vinegar as it will make their stings worse. Instead rinse the area with a baking soda/sea water mixture!
  4. Contrary to popular believe, you should never pee on a jellyfish sting! Depending on the urine, it can make things worse! Urine does not have the right chemical make-up to solve the problem!
  5. Antihistamines and applying hydrocortisone cream will help reduce itching and swelling.
  6. Get medical help.

 

Kiting in warm water and wearing a bathing suit while kiting is so much more fun than kiting in a wetsuit. Agree? But have you ever come out of the water with an itchy rash over your body and wondered what that is? Maybe you didn’t discover it till you were back in your room and you thought it might be sand fleas or mosquitos. Chances are that you have had an encounter with sea lice. Other common words are Agua Mala, Pica-Pica, Sea Bather’s Eruption. Sea lice occur in warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean and along the east and the west coasts of the United States. Sea lice are actually no lice at all, they are the larvae of the thimble jellyfish and other ocean stingers. The larvae is not visible to the naked eye. Their stinging cells are the same as the adults. In the water you may but not necessarily experience a stinging sensation. You may not feel anything when getting out of the water. The itchy rash develops within 24 hours after being in the ocean. Areas of bare skin are usually not affected but when they filter through your bathing suit, the fabric acts like a net. You know it’s probably sea lice if the rash is located on areas of skin that were covered by water-permeable clothing like your bikini or shorts.

3611040012_39b79742f6_b copy

Treatment of sea lice stings:

  1. Do not scratch the area. This will make things worse and result in even more intense itching. (Easier said than done: I have had sea lice stings and they itch like hell. But itching them will REALLY make things bad and the rash will get even more visible. So DON’T ITCH THEM)
  2. Remove the swim clothing as soon as possible.
  3. Shower with uncontaminated sea water if possible. A hot freshwater shower with soap is a less-effective alternative.
  4. Mashine-wash the contaminated swimsuit.
  5. Apply diluted vinegar to the affected area to deactivate the stinging cells.
  6. Hydrocortisone and antihistamines may also help.

 

Different people are affected differently by the stings. The immune system seems to play a role in the severity of the reaction.

 

The best way is to prevent. The only product I found is SAFE SEA sting protection lotion.

Chemical stoppers in the SAFE SEA block stop the chemical pathways where the stinging process is activated. The lotion is waterproof and comes in different SPF levels to suit the level of protection you need.

 

The SAFE SEA lotion can be bought here:

Safe Sea Kids Anti-Jellyfish Sting Lotion 30+ SPF

 

 

 

Another way of prevention is to swim or kite naked 😛

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